http://www.rssboard.org/rss-specification 720 XTF Search Results (subject=Cantors (Judaism) -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Photographs.;subject-join=exact;smode=advanced;brand=default;f1-subject=Cantors (Judaism) -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Photographs.) http://norton.wrhs.org/collections/search?subject%3DCantors%20(Judaism)%20--%20Ohio%20--%20Cleveland%20--%20Photographs.;subject-join%3Dexact;smode%3Dadvanced;brand%3Ddefault;f1-subject%3DCantors%20(Judaism)%20--%20Ohio%20--%20Cleveland%20--%20Photographs. Results for your query: subject=Cantors (Judaism) -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Photographs.;subject-join=exact;smode=advanced;brand=default;f1-subject=Cantors (Judaism) -- Ohio -- Cleveland -- Photographs. Tue, 28 Jul 2020 12:00:00 GMT B'nai Jeshurun Congregation Photographs. B'nail Jeshurun Congregation http://norton.wrhs.org/collections/view?docId=ead/PG492.xml B'nai Jeshurun Congregation, one of the largest Conservative synagogues in the United States, was established in 1866 by Jewish Hungarian immigrants as an Orthodox synagogue in Cleveland, Ohio. In 1884, a vacated synagogue building on Eagle Street in Cleveland housed the congregation. Buildings on Scoville Avenue and East 55th Street were home to the congregation from 1906-1926, when the congregation moved to Mayfield and Lee Roads, Cleveland Heights, Ohio. In 1980 B'nai Jeshurun moved to Fairmount Boulevard, Pepper Pike, Ohio. A gradual shift from the Orthodox to Conservative movement began under the first rabbi, Sigmond Dreschler. Over the years, portions of the congregation broke away over the issue of liberalization of religious practices and formed new congregations, including Oheb Zedek in 1904 and Beth Am in 1933. Rabbi Rudolph M. Rosenthal served the then firmly Conservative congregation from 1933-1976. The collection consists of individual portraits of rabbis, presidents of the synagogue, and cantor... http://norton.wrhs.org/collections/view?docId=ead/PG492.xml Wed, 01 Jan 2014 12:00:00 GMT Judah Rubinstein Photographs. Rubinstein, Judah http://norton.wrhs.org/collections/view?docId=ead/PG528.xml Judah Rubinstein was an archivist, historian, author and research associate for the Jewish Community Federation of Cleveland, and a well-known authority on Cleveland Jewish history. He helped to establish the Cleveland Jewish Archives at the Western Reserve Historical Society in 1976. He provided research for a number of books on Cleveland Jewish history and co-authored the book "Merging traditions: Jewish life in Cleveland." The collection consists of 4000 black and white images presented as prints, slides, contact sheets, and negatives, all relating to Cleveland, Ohio, Jewish history. Of note are businesses, public and religious schools, synagogues, theaters, and communal activities in the 19th and first half of the 20th century, particularly in the Woodland, Glenville, and Kinsman neighborhoods. Images of Jewish holiday and life cycle celebrations are also found here. Also of note are portraits of prominent individuals and families, including Moses Alsbacher, Alfred A. Benesch, Aaron and Moses Halle, Maur... http://norton.wrhs.org/collections/view?docId=ead/PG528.xml Wed, 01 Jan 2014 12:00:00 GMT Park Synagogue Photographs. Park Synagogue http://norton.wrhs.org/collections/view?docId=ead/PG488.xml Park Synagogue, one of the largest Conservative Jewish synagogues in the world, was founded in 1869 in Cleveland, Ohio, as Anshe Emeth Congregation by twelve Jewish immigrant families from Poland. In 1904, the congregation engaged its first English speaking rabbi, Samuel Margolies. Anshe Emeth merged with Congregation Beth Tefilo ca. 1916, and a large synagogue was built for the combined congregation on East 105th Street in 1922. That same year, Rabbi Solomon Goldman, a well known scholar, teacher, and activist, was hired. He led the congregation into the ranks of Conservative Judaism. In 1934, the congregation engaged one of its own confirmands, Armond E. Cohen, as rabbi. The synagogue, popularly called the Cleveland Jewish Center, became a focus of Jewish life in the Glenville area, serving the social, intellectual, and recreational needs, as well as the religious, of its members; one of the first synagogues in the United States combining all of these facilities in one structure. Following the eastward move... http://norton.wrhs.org/collections/view?docId=ead/PG488.xml Thu, 01 Jan 2015 12:00:00 GMT